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The business of women in STEM

Cass is contributing to celebrations for Ada Lovelace Day on Tuesday 13th October by championing female students who work in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

Cass is contributing to celebrations for Ada Lovelace Day on Tuesday 13th October by championing female students who work in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

Born Ada Gordon in 1815, Ada Lovelace was the only child of poet Lord Byron and his wife Annabella Milbanke. Fascinated with machines, she was taught science, logic and mathematics from an early age and designed boats and steam flying engines. In 1833, Lovelace was introduced to mathematician Charles Babbage. Between 1842 and 1843, she translated an article by Luigi Menabrea on Babbage's general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. She supplemented her translation with notes containing what is considered to be the first ever computer program - an algorithm encoded for processing by a machine.

Ada Lovelace 

Ada Lovelace Day is a way to raise the profile of women in science, technology, engineering and maths by encouraging people around the world to talk about the women whose work they admire.

Cass Associate Dean, MBA Programmes, Dr Sionade Robinson said: “The story of Ada Lovelace inspires many women and girls around the world. We too want to recognise the huge contribution women are making in STEM subjects, where regrettably they are still somewhat under-represented in senior positions.

“An MBA is about increasing business and organisational literacy, creating new opportunities and building leadership confidence. Ada had a strong technical expertise (in mathematics) combined with a strong interest in practical problem solving and a friendly and collaborative style  – an ideal Cass MBA candidate in fact.”

Read about the experiences of three of our MBA students in STEM careers here.

To Celebrate Ada Lovelace Day Cass Business School has launched a new MBA scholarship for Women in STEM fields.

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