Projects

JUICE: Computational Support for Creative Story Development by Journalists - Funder: Google Year: 2015 - 2016

CIBIS: Creativity in Blended Interaction Spaces - Funder: The Danish Council for Strategic Research Year:2014 - 2015

Visualizing the Smart Home: Creative engagement with customer data - Funding: £196,000 Funder: E-ON Year: 2012 - 2013

COLLAGE: Creativity in Learning through Social Computing and Game mechanics in the Enterprise - Funding: €  387,000 Funder: EU Year: 2012 - 2015

CARE'N'SHARE: Creative guidance to residential and domiciliary carers - Funding: £35,442 Funder: Skills for Care Year: 2014 - 2015

MIRROR: Reflective Learning at Work - Funding: € 529,932 Funder: EU Year: 2010 - 2014

Everyday Innovation: How to enhance innovative working in employees and organisations - Funding: Funder: NESTA Year: 2009

Creative Stickies - Funding:  Funder: City, University of London Year: 2010

Information Spaces for Collaborative Creativity - Funding: £199,983 Funder: JISC e-Learning Curriculum Delivery Programme Year: 2008 - 2010

Networking Devices to Support a Process of Collaborative Creativity - Funding: £5,000 Funder: City, University of London Year: 2012

LCACE workshop - Funding: £5,000 Funder: London Centre for Arts and Cultural Enterprise Year: 2009

Creativity and Goal Modeling - Funding: €221,606.40 $100,000 CDNFunder: Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship (IEF) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellowships Program (NSERC PDF) Year: 2014-2016

JUICE: (JoUrnalIst Creative Engine)

Computational Support for Creative Story Development by Journalists

Staff and funding

Principal investigators: Professor Neil Maiden, Professor George Brock

Research Staff: Dr Konstantinos Zachos and James Lockerbie

Funding to the Centre: $US 59,400

Funding source: Google

Project description

This Google-funded project is researching, piloting and evaluating a new software prototype, called JUICE, to implement creative search strategies that journalists can use to strengthen investigative storytelling more efficiently than with current news content management and search tools. It builds on the Centre’s previous research that developed advanced creative search algorithms and interactive creativity support tools.

The JUICE prototype will be implemented in Google Docs, and provide interactive support for a journalist to explore new story directions during the early stages of story development. This support is automatically generated from automated creative searches of trusted online news stories and twitter content, and is presented to the journalist is directed prompts to stimulate the journalist’s creative thinking.

The Google news release about this project as part of the Google Computational Journalism Research Awards in Europe is at: http://googleresearch.blogspot.co.nz/2015/06/google-computational-journalism.html

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CIBIS: Creativity in Blended Interaction Spaces

Staff and funding

Principal investigator: Professor Neil Maiden, Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice

Funding source: The Danish Council for Strategic Research

Project Description

The CIBIS project develops and explores blended interaction spaces that support the creative potential of high-school students.

The objectives are to 1) demonstrate the potential for integrating multiple digital devices and analog materials in a shared environment, to support individual and group creativity, and 2) develop the theoretical foundation for the study of constraints on creativity, design ideas, generative design materials, and creative methods in design processes. As a foundation for achieving these objectives, CIBIS has established an interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers from the computer sciences, interaction design, and creativity research.

You can find out more about the project from CIBIS.

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Visualizing the Smart Home: Creative engagement with customer data

Staff and funding

Principal investigators: Dr Sara Jones, Centre for HCI Design and Dr Veselin Rakocevic, School of Maths, Computer Science and Engineering.

Research Staff: Dr Amanda Brown, Alison Duffy

Funding to City: £196,000

Funding source: E-On Research Initiative 2012

Project Description

A virtual world of Smart Home technologies that will help customers choose ways to transform their future energy usage is being created as part of E.ON's International Research Initiative.

The project aims to make a significant contribution towards engaging customers with Smart Home concepts and ensuring the technologies are developed in a user focused way. It also plans to deliver insights into the role of Smart Homes and their business potential through the development of new software visualization tools.

You can find more about the project from the E-On Research initiative.

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COLLAGE: Creativity in Learning through Social Computing and Game mechanics in the Enterprise

Staff and funding

Principal investigators: Prof Neil Maiden

Research Staff: Dr Konstantinos Zachos, Shiona Webster

Funding to City: €399,000

Funding source: EU Framework VII

Project Description

Much social creativity involves human collaboration through and about artifacts that embody collective knowledge resulting from the collaboration. It can be a catalyst to enable European SMEs and large organizations to adopt and sustain new approaches to learning by fostering non-linear and non-standard thinking and allowing promising ideas to be transformed into new processes, products, services or business models.

To this end COLLAGE will exploit new synergies between the social Web phenomenon, emerging Web analytics, collaboration and gaming technologies to energize and enable social creativity in learning.

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Care'N'Share

Staff and funding

Principal investigator: Prof Neil Maiden

Research Staff: James Lockerbie and Alise Kirtley

Funding to City: £35,442

Funding source: Skills for Care

Project Description

This project is developing an open web-site, called Care'N'Share, to provide creative guidance to residential and domiciliary carers who are caring for older people with dementia. The web-site has been developed on top of natural language parsing and inspiration-based software search technologies developed in the EU-funded project, and retrieves information about good care practices shared by care practitioners in order to guide carers to create new and valuable care actions and plans for different situations. Creativity support is also offered to carers through guidance to implement best care practices according to different published models of older person care. The project is being piloted in the county of Suffolk, in collaboration with the Suffolk Brokerage.

The Care'N'Share website is available at: http://careNshare.city.ac.uk/

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MIRROR - Reflective Learning at Work

Staff and funding

Principal investigators: Prof Neil Maiden and Dr Sara Jones

Research Staff: Dr Konstantinos Zachos and Inger Kristine Karlsen Pitts

Total funding: € 715,000

Funding source: EU Framework VII Integrated Project

Project description

The objective of the EU-funded MIRROR Integrated Project is to empower and engage professional employees when reflecting on their performance and experiences at work, so that they can learn more quickly and solve work-related problems more creatively. To do this the project will aim to help employees to increase their level and breadth of work-related experiences based on collaboration about the experiences of other employees.

City, University of London researched, developed and evaluated new forms of mobile app for use in the residential homes of older people, many with dementia. The apps were used successfully to improve the support of person-centred care in the homes. In this video, care staff, managers and sector leaders report about their experience with these apps and the improvement that use of these apps has brought.

Visit www.mirror-project.eu (the site is temporarily down but will be restored shortly) and/or contact Professor Neil Maiden to learn more about these apps and their evaluations, and to exploit these technologies in City's new venture - the Creative Care Consultancy.

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Everyday Innovation: How to enhance innovative working in employees and organisations

NESTA Research Publication

Staff and Funding

Authors: Professor Fiona Patterson, Dr Maire Kerrin, Geraldine Gatto-Roissard and Phillipa Coan

Publication Date: December 2009.

Project Description

The imperative to promote innovative working remains strong in all sectors despite the current economic climate. However, although these aspirations exist, many working practices that promote innovation are not being readily adopted by organisations.

When comparing sectors, this is particularly prevalent in public sector organisations. Here, some working practices may actually inhibit innovative working.

Similarly, whilst the employee characteristics and behaviours that enhance innovative working (such as motivation for change, openness to ideas and original problem solving) can be clearly identified and measured, there is limited evidence that organisations are actively integrating the research evidence into corporate HR policy and practice.

Leadership capability, organisational culture, and organisational values are among the most important organisational factors and initiatives that enhance innovative working. Although there is a growing awareness of this, there is a persistent gap between what we know about these factors and how they are put into practice; how to enhance innovative working continues to be the most significant challenge for organisations. This report uses several practical examples to show how to promote everyday innovative working at the employee, group, leader and organisational levels.

You can download this research report and find additional information about this research on the NESTA website.

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Creative Stickies

Staff and Funding

Principal Investigators: Prof Neil Maiden and Dr Sara Jones

Research Staff: Bogdan Suvar and Stephan Diederich

Project description

The internally-funded Creative Stickies project explored how to implement effective creativity support on multi-user devices such as the Microsoft Surface. Touch technologies such as interactive tabletops and walls offer new opportunities to support and enhance creative activities. To investigate these opportunities the project implemented an application on a Microsoft Surface that allows stakeholders to sit around a coffee table and discover ideas in a digital environment. The application replicates physical post-it notes and enhances them digitally (see below), is domain-independent and intended to be used with minimum training.

The project was undertaken within the Centre for HCI Design, and more details including photos and video can be found there.

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Information Spaces for Collaborative Creativity

Staff and funding

Principal investigator: Dr Sara Jones

Total funding: £199,983

Funding source: JISC e-Learning Curriculum Delivery Programme

Project description

This project will address a recurrent problem in design education: that students are sometimes disengaged from key 'creative conversations' and that this problem can be exacerbated by learning technologies present in the classroom or the students' wider networked world. The project will deploy trial 'information spaces' that will provide learners with the appropriate artefacts and modes of interacting with a learning situation, and with their peers and tutors, to enable them to engage more flexibly and effectively in conversations characterised by innovation and reflective, critical thinking. The lead institution is Middlesex University and the Centre is a collaborator. Further information is available from the JISC website.

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Networking Devices to Support a Process of Collaborative Creativity

Staff and funding:

Principal investigator: Dr Sara Jones

Co-investigator: Dr Veselin Rakocevic, School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Total funding: £5,000

Funding source: City, University of London, Internal funding.

Project Description:

In a creative design process, designers work in teams, using information about the environment and potential users of a future product, service or system in order to identify requirements and designs for an output that will satisfy those users' needs. This project will investigate the networking of interactive tabletops and other handheld devices to facilitate the kinds of collaborative creative processes used in the design of new systems and services.

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LCACE Workshop - IT and its Use in the Context of Museums and Art Galleries

Staff and funding:

Principal investigator: Dr Juliet Steyn, Department of Cultural Policy and Management

Co-investigator: Dr Sara Jones

Total funding: £5,000

Funding source: London Centre for Arts and Cultural Enterprise

Project Description:

Museums and their correlatives have been forced to change their ontology from that of history to economics, of education to entertainment. This mutation, a radical change of image, in everyday terms, will be considered in a one day workshop to examine the uses of new technologies in museums and their correlatives and explore their effects on the experiences of their visitors.

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Creativity and Goal Modeling

Staff and funding

Researcher/Fellow: Dr. Jennifer Horkoff

Scientist in Charge/Supervisor: Prof Neil Maiden

Total funding: €221,606.40 $100,000 CDN

Funding source: Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship (IEF) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellowships Program (NSERC PDF)

Project Description

Creativity techniques as applied to Requirements Engineering (RE) focus on finding novel and appropriate requirements, facilitating system and business innovation. However, ideas are generated in a free-form, manual fashion, with much guidance from human facilitators. Creative output is captured by analysts using text and informal diagrams, not amenable to (semi-) automated analysis, including decision support. Goal modeling and analysis captures stakeholder goals and requirements, with underlying formalisms allowing for (semi-) automated analysis over alternative requirements. However, it is not always easy for stakeholders to articulate their goals, or to come up with creative alternatives. In this project we exploit the synergies between creativity techniques and goal modeling and analysis. Specifically, we use creativity techniques to populate goal models with creative content, and use the structure of goal models to facilitate exploratory, transformational, and combinatorial creativity. We focus on capturing project output as part of online, distributed, creative, model-based support tools.

Website link: https://sites.google.com/site/creativitygm4re/

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