CebAI Case Studies

Case Studies

CebAI is developing a large number of case studies that report the effectiveness of its technologies in different work contexts. Each of these case studies is reported in one or more academic papers and/or Centre reports, which you can access from this page.

Enhancing newsroom creativity

An earlier version of the JECT.AI product, called INJECT, was installed in the newsrooms of 3 regional newspapers in Norway. Twelve journalists in the newsrooms of these newspapers were given access to the INJECT tool for a 2-month period.

Over the 2 months, most of the journalists used INJECT. Results revealed that tool use was associated with published news articles rated as more novel but not more valuable than published articles written by the same journalists without the tool. Journalists who were more open to digital technologies and changes in newsroom practices used INJECT more frequently. However, use of the tool did not increase journalist productivity. Instead, journalists who used the INJECT tended to write longer articles with more content.

More information about this case study is available in recent publications in the Communications of the ACM (Digital creativity support for original journalism) and the ACM Creativity & Cognition conference (Evaluating the use of digital creativity support by journalists in newsrooms).

The case study is also reported in this video that accompanies the Communications of the ACM publication.

Supporting creative thinking on production lines

A tablet-based interactive creativity support tool called the Risk Hunting App was designed for use by employees on the production lines of a CNH Industrial plant that was manufacturing agricultural vehicles. It was made available to the workers for an initial period of 3 months. It was designed to support plant employees to think creatively about resolutions to health-and-safety risks.

Results revealed that risk resolutions generated with the Risk Hunting App were more creative and more complete than risk resolutions generated without the system in a corresponding period. However, the employees needed more time than was available to generate more complete risk resolutions. Follow-on studies over the subsequent 6 months revealed key enablers for the uptake of the Risk Hunting App. These enablers included use of digital touchpoints that users were familiar with, immediate access to these touchpoints without the need to set up or charge them, senior employees who championed support use, and digital creativity support that delivered productivity as well as creativity benefits. The case study also revealed the importance of management support for aligning work practices and digital capabilities to support creative thinking.

More information about this case study is available in recent publications in the Behaviour and Information Technology journal (Evaluating an information system to provide creative guidance about health-and-safety in manufacturing) and the ACM Creativity & Cognition conference (Evaluating the use of digital creativity support by journalists in newsrooms).

Encouraging creative thinking in social care

Carer was a mobile software app to support creative thinking by carers for people with dementia. It supported different versions of the Other Worlds creativity technique to generate then reflect on ideas to improve resident care. An evaluation of the app in one residential home revealed that carers were able to use the app as described in the model, and deliver novel care in the home.

More information about this case study is available in this publication in the ACM Creativity & Cognition conference (A software app to support creativity in dementia care).